Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
Atsunobu Katagiri
2016/03/11 – 2016/04/17

희생, 미래에 바치는 재생의 이케바나: 카타기리 아츠노부 개인전

오프닝: 2016년 3월11일(금) 오후 7시
퍼포먼스: 2016년 4월16일 (토) 오후 6:00
춤: 이미희 , 이케바나, 카타기리 아츠노부
주관: 대안공간루프
협찬 : 한국문화예술위원회, 수퍼 네이처

Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
Opening: Mar 11th (Fri) 7:00pm, 2016
Performance: Apr 16th (Sat) 6:00pm, 2016
Dance: Lee Mi Hee, Ikebana, Atsunobu Katagiri
presented by: Alternative Space LOOP
supported by: Arts Council Korea, SUPER-NATURE Inc

Sacrifice in Fukushima

Five years have already passed since 2:46, March 11th, 2011- the Great Earthquake of East Japan. We surely must remember more than simply the enormous natural calamity our neighboring nation of Japan suffered, or the accident at a nuclear reactor resulting in massive radiation leakage. It is because this was a painful event which could only be explained as an atypical natural, or human-made, disaster aided or caused by people’s inability to control and manage natural events; and the event allowed us to seek anew humanity’s lives, which must coexist with nature, and thus ultimately reflect on inherent human life itself. Outweighing those deep wounds disasters inflict on us in importance is how these events cause us to look back and reflect on ourselves. Just as it is in all other areas of human life, contemporary arts and culture, too are likely incapable of being completely free from such scars and memories of cataclysms.

The works of ikebana (生(け)花), or traditional Japanese floral arrangement, initiate Atsunobu Katagiri in the current exhibition, too are positioned in such a context. Katagiri began visiting the town of Minamisoma in Fukushima Prefecture, located within a twenty-to-thirty-kilometer radius from the accident site in what is known as kenai (圈內, the zone), since mid-September of 2013, about two years after the disaster; moved there on December 28th of the same year and lived there through July 31st of the following year, of 2014. Just as how the significance of ikebana is to make flowers (花,はな) “come alive (生ける/活ける, いける),” the artist renewed his life at that extreme site, comparable to a desolate end of one’s life, through flowers. The artist thus witnessed the most difficulty-filled landscapes of life tenuously continuing its existence even amidst the devastation following the above disaster, and worked with innumerable flowers which arduously blossomed there while photographing this. He likely lived at the fringes of a calamity, but may also have been living while witnessing another landscape of life bordering death. This exhibition, as such, wholly delivers the artist’s reflections regarding the humanity and nature he faced during this time in his life.

Flowers blossom everywhere in the world, everywhere where life exists. Actually, flowers even blossom at the borders of death adjacent to life. Flowers are aspirations and gestures toward life. As an artist of flowering plants in Fukushima Prefecture, which a certain tragedy has made to resemble a pile of ash, Katagiri realizes anew such simple and self-evident significances of flowers. Like ikebana is an act allowing flowers to live, the artist transcends just plain ikebana- of allowing flowers to live in beauty in vases- to practice a floral arrangement facing a weakened world. The artist has set out in search of flowers extending their life amain, even amidst such a colossal natural and human-made disaster, while touring a devastated land, meditating on it while feeling it with all his senses. Therefore, the flowers the artist has sought after likely belong to more than Mother Nature. They were likely messages of hope regarding the many souls who were sacrificed in the calamity, or the presence or lives of the remaining, who have courageously continued living despite difficult life circumstances. While practicing a floral arrangement for all of them, the artist has lived another life of hope with the others who still remain at a site where many have left. This is why the artist’s current project is, like a sort of ceremony, a performance transcending the simple act of floral arrangement, and analogous to practicing life for all of us. Practicing directed toward people who remain hopeful amidst destroyed homes, and those grand currents of Mother Nature becoming renewed through alternative regeneration and rehabilitation even within the extreme disaster of nuclear pollution, as well as those who have fallen victim to the aforementioned tragedy, that is. Perhaps the artist was attempting to personally experience a life of self-discipline in which his own life could be newly purified and renewed through this. Katagiri has thus delivered a sympathetic perspective toward the existences of all who suffered due to the Great Earthquake of East Japan, and practiced floral arrangement work sympathizing and communicating with Nature’s principles while listening to the victims’ diminished voices. This is how the debris of lives destroyed by the tragedy could become found-objects and all of the nature at the disaster sites was able to become floral arrangement elements. Ikebana, to Katagiri, is now the business of fully growing hopes of life regarding the future, which refuse to cease even in the face of adversity, as well as the voices of life now lost; and simultaneously reveals the artist’s emotions and will regarding this while it transitions to an act of externalizing as flowers the artist’s certain, deep reflections regarding the world. It thus becomes a sacred act of connecting to life the gestures leading one to hope again amidst ruins, and even death. I.e., it becomes sacrifice.

The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future.

Sacrifices signify live offerings to a divine being. A sacrifice is not an ordinary death. It allows life. Floral arrangement, which takes its place in the form of a ceremony, too holds the significance of a sacrifice, and so withered flowers may not be offered as sacrificial offerings. Only freshly picked flowers may perform the role of being sacrificed. They thus allow for the extension of life through live deaths. Sacrifice, which thus mysteriously connects life with death, holds a place facing future hope as present, as opposed to past, life. This circumstance has led to the exhibition being subtitled, “The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future.” Above all, also, the lives of all these which blossom again through delicate gestures, even at a burdensome disaster site to cause the barren land to grow again and sustain itself, likely represents the very essence of sacrifice. Sacrifice is thus sustained toward the future, which is synonymous with new life. Additionally, it allows connections to past lives continuing toward the future. Fukushima Prefecture is where an abundance of artifacts from Japan’s prehistoric period of the Jomon Era (繩文時代) have been discovered, and the artist also attempts grafting his work to past lives, of when flowers in ancient Japan must have been planting their roots, through ikebana work using the Minamisoma City Museum’s artifacts. Katagiri has reconnected present lives facing the future to past lives. As such, the principles of Nature face the future while holding onto the present’s connections to the past. In this regard, ikebana is more than simply aesthetic floral arrangement. It can simultaneously be both an act connecting present lives to the past and a special action reconnecting present lives to future ones. This is because the very existence of flowers planting their roots into the earth connects with the past, and they continue their present lives into the future while repeating their life. However, flowers are hardly alone in connecting the joints of time together, as everything placed in our world for the purpose of life likely continue death and life while thus blossoming and withering again. Through his work, the artist realizes how ceaseless life and death are being repeated under the earth flowers are rooted in, and reconfirms how floral arrangement work can be something which thus connects life with death, in other words a life reborn from death.

It was for such reasons that floral offerings have found their place in religious ceremonies and various aspects of daily culture since ancient times in both the East and the West. Relative to human beings’ limited life-spans, flowers are given new life at their last living moments facing death. It is because they blossom again as eternal beauty at the moment of death and life. They possess renewability. For this reason, flowers signify and symbolize renewal and revitalization. In addition to these general significances of flowers, the artist makes flowers’ significances of revival and recovery even clearer by dramatically contrasting them with humanity’s catastrophic ways. Those clear and elaborate colors which only seem to fully emit their presence even at an ashen disaster site, and the graceful figures facing life even in moments of death, reflect this. Thus, this exhibition’s flower images and video capture the distinct attitudes toward life held by the people who, through their frail but solid gestures, have never lost their hope for the future despite their reality of a confused and miserable disaster. Those sorrowful yet infinitely beautiful appearances are likely their lives themselves which have been delivered to us, and simultaneously none other than a message and gestures of a certain hope which allows us to continue living again. Together with this, they give form to certain future values, in which people and nature must coexist without borders between them. It is because flowers have bloomed at those borders, within the division, and will blossom again.

Also, a performance by the dancer, Lee Mi-hee, who worked with the artist at the disaster site, moves all of us through sublime gestures seeking to oust evil energies and misfortune while firmly getting back on one’s feet with new hope, if on barren soil. This, too must be one and the same as an act of flowering. Such a desire and will for restoration and revival are reconfirmed in this exhibition’s floral installation piece using suspension and paper boats. Particularly, this piece resonates more extraordinarily and profoundly with us Koreans, who have experienced the disastrous tragedy of the Sewol Ferry and are still bound to an extent by the resulting wounds and pain.

As such, this exhibition visualizes a reflective image of salvation regarding an enormous catastrophe comparable to humanity’s Original Sin. However, rather than stopping at reminding us of the social and cultural significances of the Great Earthquake of East Japan’s calamity and disaster itself, which are still in progress; it delivers a certain hope of all of us, which humanity cannot help but have, through the ceremonial and artistic act of floral arrangement, which is likely none other than a gesture of hope even amidst such miserable ruins. It also leads us to reflect once again on contemporary art’s significance, role and attitudes regarding the realm of disasters by pulling that realm into the magnetic field of today’s art culture. It also has us confirming how even the exceedingly aesthetic, ordinary act of arranging flowers for appreciation can only achieve the rich significances of contemporary arts when it is based in reality and directed at all of our futures. We thus share and sympathize with how modest and ordinary practices firmly rooted in the soil of reality can gain new life as contemporary art to become life’s major topic of hope.

Written by Min Byung Jic
Vice Director, Alternative Space LOOP

Atsunobu Katagiri
Born 1973 in Osaka,Japan. At the age of 24, he became the head master of Misasasgi Ikebana school. Known for incorporating both traditional and modern approaches in his Ikebana works, as well as for collaborating with artists of different mediums. Katagiri`s work ranges from small scale compositions using wild flowers to large compositions using the cherry blossom, a theme he has maintained for several years. Through his works, he contemplates the concept of “Anima“-the primary motif of Ikebana-and through the use of flowers he creates a unique aura.

희생, 미래에 바치는 재생의 이케바나

2011년 3월 11일 2시 46분. 동일본 대지진이 일어난 지 어느덧 5년의 세월이 흘렀다. 우리가 기억해야 하는 것은 단지 이웃나라 일본이 처해야 했던 자연의 거대한 재앙과 대규모의 방사능 누출이라는 원전 사고만이 전부는 아닐 것이다. 자연적인 재해나 이에 대한 인간의 통제, 관리 무능에서 비롯된 인재만으로 설명될 수 없는, 자연과 더불어 공존해야만 하는 인류의 삶을 다시금 모색하도록 하고 그렇게 인간 본연의 삶 자체를 궁극적으로 반성할 수 있도록 한 뼈아픈 사건이었기 때문이다. 재난은 그 깊은 상처에 앞서 우리로 하여금 스스로를 돌이켜, 다시 성찰하도록 만든다. 인간의 다른 모든 분야와 마찬가지로 동시대 문화예술 역시 이러한 재난의 상흔과 기억으로부터 온전히 자유로울 수 없을 것이다.

이케바나(生(け)花), 일본 전통 꽃꽂이 전수자인 카타기리 아츠노부의 이번 전시의 작업도 이러한 맥락에 자리한다. 그는 재난 이후 2년째가 되는 2013년 9월 중순부터 사고지역으로부터 반경 20에서 30킬로미터 떨어진 이른바 켄나이(圈內, the zone)에 위치한 후쿠시마 현의 미나미소마 시에 방문하기 시작하여, 그해 12월 28일 그곳으로 이사하여 다음해인 2014년 7월 31일까지 그곳에서 살았다. ‘꽃(花,はな)’을 ‘살아있도록 하는(生ける/活ける, いける)’ 이케바나의 의미가 그런 것처럼 비록 짧은 기간이었지만 작가는 황폐해진 삶의 종착역과도 같은 그 극단의 현장에서 꽃으로 자신의 삶을 새롭게 살도록 했다. 그렇게 재난 이후의 모진 환경 속에서도 가녀리게 이어지고 있었던 삶의 지난한 풍경들을 보았고 그곳에서 힘겹게 핀 무수한 꽃들로 이케바나 작업을 하면서 이를 카메라에 담아냈다. 재난의 끝에서 삶을 살았던 것이겠지만 어쩌면 죽음과도 맞닿아 있는 또 다른 삶의 풍경을 목도하면서 살았던 것일지도 모른다. 이번 전시는 그렇게 그 시기 동안 겪어온 작가의 삶 속에서 마주하고 사유한, 인간과 자연에 대한 성찰들을 그대로 전한다.

세상의 모든 곳, 생명이 있는 모든 곳에서 꽃들은 피어난다. 아니 생명과 맞닿아 있는 죽음의 경계에서조차 꽃들은 피어난다. 꽃은 생명을 향한 몸짓이며 희구이다. 재난으로 잿더미가 되어 버린 후쿠시마 현에서 화훼작가로서 작가는 꽃이 가진 이러한 단순하고 자명한 의미들을 다시금 깨닫게 된다. 이케바나가 꽃을 살도록 하는 행위인 것처럼 작가는 그저 화병 속에 아름답게 꽃들을 살아있도록 하는 이케바나를 넘어, 시들어가는 세상을 향한 꽃꽂이를 수행한다. 재난으로 황폐해진 대지를 온몸으로 감각하고 사유하면서 그렇게 순례하면서 그 거대한 자연과 인류의 재앙 속에서도 힘겹게 다시금 생명을 이어가는 꽃들을 찾아 나선 것이다. 그렇기에 작가가 찾으려 한 그 꽃들은 비단 자연의 꽃들만이 아닐 것이다. 재난으로 희생된 많은 이들의 넋 혹은 힘겨운 삶의 현장에서도 꿋꿋이 삶을 이어간 남아있는 이들의 존재, 혹은 그들의 삶에 대한 희망의 전언들이었을 것이다. 작가는 이 모두를 위한 꽃꽂이를 수행하면서 많은 이들이 떠난 그 자리에서, 여전히 남아있는 또 다른 이들과 함께 다시 또 다른 희망의 삶을 살았던 것이다. 그렇기에 작가의 이번 프로젝트는 일종의 제의처럼, 단순한 꽃꽂이 행위를 넘어서는 퍼포먼스이자 우리 모두를 위한 삶의 실천들로 다가온다. 재난으로 희생된 사람들은 물론 파괴된 삶의 터전 속에서 여전히 희망의 끊을 놓지 않은 사람들과 방사능 오염이라는 극단의 재해 속에서도 다시 또 다른 재생, 재활로 거듭나는 저 거대한 대자연의 순리를 향한 실천 말이다. 어쩌면 이를 통해 자신의 삶조차 새롭게 정화시켜 거듭날 수 있는 수행의 삶을 몸소 겪으려 했는지도 모르겠다. 작가는 이렇게 동일본대지진으로 상처를 겪어야 했던 그 모두의 존재를 향해 공감의 시선을 건네고 그 낮은 목소리에 귀를 기울이면서 이들 대자연의 흐름들과 공감하고 소통하는 꽃꽂이 작업을 수행했던 것이다. 인간을 포함한 대지의 숨결로 다시 소생되는 꽃꽂이 말이다. 재난으로 파괴된 삶의 잔해들이 오브제가 되고 재난 현장의 그 모든 자연들이 꽃꽂이의 요소들이 될 수 있었던 이유들이다. 작가에게 이케바나는 이제 고난 속에서도 끊이지 않은 미래를 향한 삶의 희망들을 가득 채우는 일인 동시에 이를 향한 자신의 감정과 의지를 드러내고 세상에 대한 어떤 깊은 성찰을 꽃으로 외화시키는 행위로 전환된다. 그렇게 폐허 속에서 다시 희망을 품도록 하는 몸짓들, 죽음조차 삶으로 연결시키는 성스러운 행위가 되는 것이다. ‘Sacrifice’, 희생 말이다.

미래에 바치는 재생의 이케바나

희생은 신에게 공물로 바치는 살아있는 제물을 의미한다. 희생은 단순한 죽음이 아니다. 살도록 하는 것이다. 제의의 형식으로 자리하는 꽃꽂이 역시 희생의 의미를 담고 있기에 시들어진 꽃들은 제물로 제공되지 못한다. 신선하게 꺾인 살아있는 꽃들만이 희생의 역할을 수행할 수 있는 것이다. 그렇게 살아있는 죽음으로 생을 이어가도록 한다. 이렇게 삶과 죽음을 신비스럽게 잇는 희생은 현재의 삶으로 미래의 희망을 향해 자리한다. 이번 전시의 부제를 《미래에 바치는 재생의 이케바나》라고 한 속내이다. 그리고 무엇보다도 힘겨운 재난의 현장에서도 가녀린 몸짓으로 다시 피어나, 척박한 대지를 다시 움트게 하여 지속케 하는 이 모든 것들의 삶이야말로 희생 그 자체일 것이다. 그렇게 희생은 새로운 생에 다름 아닌 미래를 향해 지속된다. 뿐만 아니라 미래를 향해 이어진 과거의 삶 또한 연결케 한다. 후쿠시마 현은 일본의 선사시대인 조몬시대(繩文時代) 유물이 다수 발견된 곳이고 작가는 미나미소마 시립 박물관의 조몬시대 소장품을 활용한 이케바나 작업을 통해 먼 옛날 그곳의 꽃들이 뿌리를 내렸을 과거의 삶과도 접목을 시도한다. 미래로 향한 현재의 삶을 다시 과거의 삶과 이어간 것이다. 대자연의 순리는 이처럼 미래로 향하면서도 다시 과거와의 이어진 현재의 끈들을 놓지 않는다. 그런 면에서 이케바나는 단순히 꽃들의 심미적인 배열만이 아니다. 현재의 삶을 과거와 연결하는 행위인 동시에 이를 다시 미래의 생으로 이어가는 각별한 행위일 수 있는 것이다. 대지에 뿌리를 내린 꽃들의 존재 자체가 과거와 연결되는 것이고, 그 생을 다시 반복하면서 현재의 삶을 미래로 이어가는 것이기 때문이다. 하지만 시간의 마디를 이어가는 것이 어디 꽃뿐일까, 삶을 위해 자리한 모든 것들이 그렇게 다시 피고지면서 죽음과 생을 이어갈 테니 말이다. 작가는 이들 작업을 통해 꽃들이 뿌리내리고 있는 대지 아래 끊임없는 생과 사가 반복되고 있음을 깨닫고, 꽃꽂이 작업이 이렇게 삶과 죽음을 연결시키는 것임을, 다시 말해 죽음으로부터 다시 태어난 삶일 수 있음을 재차 확인한다.

이런 이유들로 인해 일찍이 꽃을 바치는 행위인 헌화가 종교 의례는 물론 일상문화 곳곳에서 동서고금을 막론하고 행해졌던 것이다. 인간의 유한한 삶에 비해 꽃은 죽음을 향한 생의 마지막 순간에 또 다른 생으로 거듭난다. 죽음과 삶의 순간에서 다시 영속적인 아름다움으로 피어나기 때문이다. 재생성을 가지고 있는 것이다. 그런 이유로 꽃은 재생, 재활의 의미, 상징성을 가진다. 작가는 꽃이 갖고 있는 이러한 일반적인 의미에 더해, 재난이라는 인류의 파국적인 삶을 극적으로 대비시킴으로써 꽃이 갖고 있는 재생, 재활의 의미를 더욱더 분명하게 한다. 잿빛 파국의 현장 속에서도 오롯이 자신의 존재감을 발하고 있는 것만 같은 저 선명하고 화려한 색들과 죽음의 순간에서도 생을 향한 단아한 자태들이 이를 반증한다. 그렇게 이번 전시가 전하는 꽃들의 이미지, 영상은 황망하고 참혹한 재난이라는 현실 속에서도 가녀리지만 단단한 몸짓으로 미래를 향한 희망을 놓지 않았던 사람들의 삶을 향한 어떤 지향들을 담아낸다. 그 처연하면서도 한없이 아름다운 모습들은 우리에게 전해진 그들의 삶 자체인 동시에 그로 인해 우리의 삶을 다시 지속케 하는 어떤 희망의 전언과 몸짓들에 다름 아닐 것이다. 아울러 인간과 자연이 경계를 두지 않고 함께 공존해야 하는 미래의 어떤 가치들을 형상화시킨다. 그 경계, 그 사이에서 꽃들이 피어났고, 다시 피어날 테니 말이다. 한편, 재난 현장 바로 그곳에서 작가와 함께 한 무용가 이미희의 퍼포먼스도 나쁜 액운과 기운을 몰아내고 새로운 희망으로 척박한 대지에 단단한 발을 내딛고 다시 일어서려는 숭고한 몸짓으로 우리 모두의 가슴에 와 닿는다. 이 또한 꽃을 피우는 행위에 다름 아닐 것이다. 이러한 회생, 소생의 염원과 의지는 이번 전시에서 마주하게 되는, 종이배에 드리운 꽃 설치 작업에서도 재차 확인되는 것들이다. 특히나 이 작업은 세월호 참사를 겪고 아직도 그 상처와 아픔에서 온전히 자유롭지 못한 우리에게 더욱더 각별하고 의미심장한 울림을 전한다.

이번 전시는 이처럼 인류의 원죄와도 같은 거대 재난에 대한 성찰적 구원의 이미지를 가시화시킨다. 하지만 단지 현재에도 여전히 지속되는 동일본 대지진이라는 재난, 재해 자체의 사회적이고 문화적인 의미를 환기시키는데 그치는 것만이 아니라 그러한 참혹한 폐허 속에서도 희망의 몸짓에 다름 아닐 꽃꽂이라는 제의적이고 예술적인 행위를 통해 인류가 가질 수밖에 없는 우리 모두의 어떤 희망을 전한다. 그리고 재난의 영역을 동시대 미술문화의 자장으로 끌어들임으로써 이에 대한 동시대 예술의 의미와 역할, 그 태도에 관한 것들을 다시금 성찰하도록 한다. 아울러 꽃꽂이라는 지극히 심미적인 일상의 행위조차 현실에 바탕을 두고 우리 모두의 미래로 향할 때 비로소 동시대 예술 또한 그 풍부한 의미를 획득할 수 있음을 확인하게 한다. 그렇게 현실이라는 대지에 단단히 뿌리내린 일상의 작은 실천들이 동시대 예술로 거듭나, 희망이라는 삶의 화두가 될 수 있음을 공유, 공감케 하는 것이다.

글: 민병직, 대안공간 루프 바이스 디렉터

카타기리 아츠노부 片桐功敦
1973년 오사카 출생. 24세에 오사카 사카이시의 마사사기류파의 이케바나 전수자가 되었다. 작가의 이케바나는 거친 야생화를 사용하는 작은 규모의 꽃꽂이를 비롯하여 설치, 사진, 미디어 등으로 그 범위를 확장시키고 있는데, 전통의 계승은 물론 다른 예술 장르와의 다채로운 협업을 통해 현대적 미감으로 발전시키는데서 각별한 의의를 찾을 수 있다. 이처럼 카타기리 아츠노부는 꽃꽂이를 통해 이케바나의 주요 모티브이자 개념인 ‘아니마’를 구현하고자 노력하면서, 인간과 자연의 경계를 허물어가는 독특한 작업세계를 구축하고 있다.

  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Lee Mihee, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Lee Mihee, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future
  • Sacrifice in FUKUSHIMA, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future: Atsunobu Katagiri Solo Exhibition
    Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, The Ikebana of Regeneration, Offered to the Future